All posts by ckponderings

Limbo

We are all of us in limbo at the moment. It seems like someone pressed the Pause button on 2020 back in February, and nobody seems to know how to get it kick started again.

Limbo is a dangerous place; we run the risk of becoming lethargic, or apathy setting in; things we would normally crack on with no longer seem important because, as I alluded to the other day, we can always do it tomorrow.

We run the risk of becoming a society of procrastinators, holding off, pacing ourselves, because if we end up doing something too quickly, we will have nothing to do tomorrow, or the next day or the next.

We are stuck ‘in-between’, a world waiting for something to happen, but not sure when it will, or what it will be.

Is there an easy answer?

9 in 45: 31st March 2020

In this time of restrictions and “one walk per day”, what better use of that time outside than to undertake a “9-in-45”?

The idea of the project is to set out on a walk with a phone/stopwatch and your camera. Set your stopwatch for five minutes and start walking. When the five minutes is up, stop walking. You have a minute to compose and take a photograph. Set your stopwatch for another five minutes and start walking. When the time is up, stop and, within a minute take and compose your second photo. Keep going until you have walked for 45 minutes and have nine photos.

So, the nine photos…


31st March 2020 – 08:58

It was a crisp, bright morning, and I had an idea of where I wanted to go. Living in Glastonbury now, I am fortunate enough to have the Tor virtually on my doorstep (as you will see, 15 minutes or so from the summit!).

Walking up to the main road, I pass the Rural Life Museum – currently closed, as with most other places at the moment. I have seen the bicycle sign on numerous occasions, and it just happened that, when my first five minutes were up, I was close enough to it to include it in my set of nine photos!


31st March 2020 – 09:04

At the base of the Tor are these two stones. There are a lot of pieces of stone in and around Glastonbury – half of the town was built from pieces of the Abbey when it was dissolved in 1539. The thing that has always caught my eye, however, is the symbol on the one on the left. I think it’s military, but I’m not sure…


31st March 2020 – 09:10

I will be honest, I am not as fit as I once was, or as I should be. I may well have not walked continuously between taking the 09:04 photo and the one above… In my defence, however, the Tor is blooming steep, and it’s only fair that I sat down on a handy bench on the way up the climb…

A fair proportion of the planet may be in lock down, but here in the Northern Hemisphere, Spring is continuing unabated… This shot, of some cherry blossom, turned out better than I thought immediately after taking the photo. (I had intended a smaller aperture, but when I had taken the shot, I realised the camera was set to f/8. However, the depth of focus turned out to be pretty much what I was aiming for!)

Right, I’d better continue my climb, then…


31st March 2020 – 09:16

Mr C’s strict rules state that selfies should not be included in the 9-in-45, but halfway up the Tor, my options were limited. I wanted to avoid the bulk standard countryside views, but the sun was still fairly low in the sky and my shadow was too good an opportunity to miss!


31st March 2020 – 09:22

In recent weeks, the summit of the Tor has been distinctly devoid of visitors (a combination of isolation and the weather). However, at other times – at the height of the tourist season or on pagan celebratory days – it can be teeming with people.

I will be honest, I prefer it quiet. With its 360° view of the levels, it is an ideal space for reflection and meditation, as you can see!


31st March 2020 – 09:27

I awarded myself a five minute sit down before moving on, but the 9-in-45 had to continue unabated. The image of perfect calm belies the fact that is was blowing an icy gale and, to be honest, I was more than happy to start moving again!


31st March 2020 – 09:33

Unsurprisingly, while it took nearly 20 minutes to climb the Tor, it only took five to walk back down again!

At the base of the hill, in a sheltered, sunny location, is the Avalon Orchard. Another place for reflection and contemplation, these old fruit trees hold decades of history in their gnarled and twisted branches.

Rather than a wide shot of trees, I thought I would close in tighter, and this fungus caught my eye as soon as the timer on my phone alerted me to the end of the the next five-minute window.


31st March 2020 – 09:39

Time for the money shot, then; I’ve talked a lot about the Tor, but not had a photo of it yet!


31st March 2020 – 09:45

The wind may still be fresh, but the sun has been in full attendance over the last few days, so one final shot to show that spring has definitely sprung!


The photos and the route in more detail:


I have completed the 9-in-45 project a number of times now – click on the links below to see the results:

And the original “Take Nine Photos In Forty Five Minutes” collection can be found by clicking the link.


Time

A lot of what is going on in the world at the moment is weird. I mean plain WEIRD. In four short weeks, society has been turned on its head and it’s taking us a long time to get used to it.

There are lots of high impact, big things going on, but often it’s a combination of smaller changes, little side effects that build and build to screw with our minds.

While I know it’s not life shattering in the grand scheme of things, time of one of the elements I have noticed has changed.


I moved to Somerset from West Sussex in mid-February. It’s a move I’d been planning for a number of years, and everything had fallen into place for it to happen in the early months of 2020.

I was moving down here without employment and lucky enough to have a financial buffer to be able to not worry about working for a while. In effect, I have been in the fortunate position to be able to semi-retire.

The thing I have found since the move is that time loses its meaning. Days and weeks have quickly merged into one, and weekends have become almost meaningless. For the first time in about twenty years, I have had to keep a mini diary to enable me to track what I have been doing each day.

This has ramped up even more over the last week or so, since the lock-down really kicked in here in the UK. With shops, cafes, pubs and restaurants closing down and other places to visit – National Trust properties, museums, etc. – being extremely limited, the complete freedom we once enjoyed has been (understandably and rightly) restricted even more.

What I have found this has led to can be summed up very simply:

“I can do that tomorrow.”

For me, someone who very readily would look to ‘do today’, this has been really frustrating. I find myself running the risk of putting off simple things; well not even putting off, but delaying, ‘spreading the joy’ of confinement.

Trying to find structure in the time of coronavirus is increasingly becoming a challenge. Routine is disappearing, commitments have little meaning, time passes quickly, with little or nothing to show for it.


To take part in the current Mass Observation Project post on ISOLATION:

  • Take a photograph based on the theme of ISOLATION, however you want to interpret it.
  • Email the image to adayinphotographs@outlook.com by Wednesday 1st April 2020.
  • Images should be a maximum of 650 pixels wide.
  • Include your name, website/blog address and a short note about the image, including where it was taken.
  • Come back and see the results on Sunday 5th April!

Change

One of the things about the current situation we are all finding ourselves in at the moment are the changes that are happening to the way we do things, the way we work, the way we live.

Shops – the few that remain open – are opting for card payments, rather than cash. Businesses are finding ways to work with staff working from home. Television and radio channels are streamlining their workforce (BBC Radio sharing news reports, rather than having individual ones, for example) and using classic television (repeats) as a focus for their prime time programming.

While we are in an emergency situation, I do wonder if the new normal will be a permanent replacement for the old normal when this is all over. Will these emergency changes become commonplace post-Coronavirus?


To take part in the current Mass Observation Project post on ISOLATION:

  • Take a photograph based on the theme of ISOLATION, however you want to interpret it.
  • Email the image to adayinphotographs@outlook.com by Wednesday 1st April 2020.
  • Images should be a maximum of 650 pixels wide.
  • Include your name, website/blog address and a short note about the image, including where it was taken.
  • Come back and see the results on Sunday 5th April!

Calm

Here in the UK, we are in a partial lockdown, and our opportunities to leave our homes are limited. This includes one lot of exercise per day, and this constitutional is something we will be relishing and making the most of while we can.

The bonus for these walks is that the weather has currently taken a big turn towards spring. While I appreciate that this won’t always be the case, it does mean that we have taken a definite move away from the weeks of rain we encountered earlier in the year.

The walk provides us with an opportunity to connect with nature – to reconnect with it. Roads are quieter and the lack or traffic noise means that our ears are more alert to the sounds of nature around us.

Birdsong seems louder than it did before.

The trees rustling in the breeze hits us more than it did before.

The quiet is deafening, but not in a negative way. It is more of a comfort, heightening the connection we have with the world around us, a connection the ‘normal’ world had deprived us of.


To take part in the current Mass Observation Project post on ISOLATION:

  • Take a photograph based on the theme of ISOLATION, however you want to interpret it.
  • Email the image to adayinphotographs@outlook.com by Wednesday 1st April 2020.
  • Images should be a maximum of 650 pixels wide.
  • Include your name, website/blog address and a short note about the image, including where it was taken.
  • Come back and see the results on Sunday 5th April!

Blossom

We all need a bit of peace and harmony at the moment. In a world full of crisis, everybody’s lives have been turned on their heads.

The space we have been granted by the enforced isolation (whether working from home or in quarantine) has enabled us to appreciate the space we inhabit.

The lack of physical contact with others outside of our own households – particularly those we care deeply for – helps us realise how much we might have taken them for granted. When this is all over, I think we are all going to be much more appreciative of the relationships we have, the relationships we will have been isolated from for weeks or months.


To take part in the current Mass Observation Project post on ISOLATION:

  • Take a photograph based on the theme of ISOLATION, however you want to interpret it.
  • Email the image to adayinphotographs@outlook.com by Wednesday 1st April 2020.
  • Images should be a maximum of 650 pixels wide.
  • Include your name, website/blog address and a short note about the image, including where it was taken.
  • Come back and see the results on Sunday 5th April!

Lady Chapel, Glastonbury

Lady Chapel, Glastonbury Abbey

The Lady Chapel lies at the western end of Glastonbury Abbey and is the most complete of the ruins in the grounds.

Built in the late twelfth century, it is a serene place to wander around, and its solid walls and crypt contrast beautifully with the open greenery of the Great Church.



We have a tendency, when walking around, to only focus on the big picture, and rarely stop to take time and really look at our surroundings. Hundreds of craftsmen spent countless hours to create, carve, paint and mould architectural elements we either take for granted or we do not see at all.

When you’re out and about, stop, take time to look around you and SEE what is there. Find the beauty in the intricate, in the insignificant, in the overlooked.


To take part in the current Mass Observation Project post on ISOLATION:

  • Take a photograph based on the theme of ISOLATION, however you want to interpret it.
  • Email the image to adayinphotographs@outlook.com by Wednesday 1st April 2020.
  • Images should be a maximum of 650 pixels wide.
  • Include your name, website/blog address and a short note about the image, including where it was taken.
  • Come back and see the results on Sunday 5th April!

Glastonbury Vehicles

To continue the Glastonbury theme, here are a collection of vehicles seen out and about around the town…

Click on the images to see larger versions.


The beauty of the town, as I have mentioned previously, is its diversity. Where else would the Egg Man park alongside the Mystery Machine?!


To take part in the new Mass Observation Project post on ISOLATION:

  • Take a photograph based on the theme of ISOLATION, however you want to interpret it.
  • Email the image to adayinphotographs@outlook.com by Wednesday 1st April 2020.
  • Images should be a maximum of 650 pixels wide.
  • Include your name, website/blog address and a short note about the image, including where it was taken.
  • Come back and see the results on Sunday 5th April!

Mass Observation – ISOLATION

Isolation

It’s time for a new Mass Observation Project post and it would be great to get you, dear viewers, involved! With everything going on in the world at the moment, the next theme is going to be ISOLATION.

The idea, as with previous MO posts is to:

  • Take a photograph based on the theme of ISOLATION, however you want to interpret it.
  • Email the image to adayinphotographs@outlook.com by Wednesday 1st April 2020.
  • Images should be a maximum of 650 pixels wide.
  • Include your name, website/blog address and a short note about the image, including where it was taken.
  • Come back and see the results on Sunday 5th April!

Glastonbury Spring

As with much of the UK, Somerset has had a pretty damp start to the year (in fact, it’s chucking it down yet again as I type). But, grey clouds notwithstanding, there are signs that spring is on the horizon, and so for my second ode to my new home, I thought I would post some budding new photographs.

(Click on an image to see a larger version and scroll to the bottom for some information about a new post!)



Even on the darkest of days there is a hint of brighter things to come, and he knew this gave him an advantage he would be able to press home. He could show her that things had changed, that he had changed.

He knew that the temptation he had given into has been ill-advised – no, more than that, it had been the stupidest thing he had ever done! – but she had hinted that there was the slightest of opportunities, the tiniest glimmer of hope that he would be able to rectify the damage he had done.

The “slip” – that was what they had taken to calling it – had happened last autumn, and this new spring gave him the hope, the push to start putting things back together again…


It’s time for a new Mass Observation Project post too! With everything going on in the world at the moment, the next theme is going to be ISOLATION.

The idea, as with previous MO posts is to:

  • Take a photograph based on the theme, however you want to interpret it.
  • Email the image to adayinphotographs@outlook.com by Wednesday 1st April 2020.
  • Include your name, website/blog address and a short note about the image.
  • Come back and see the results on Sunday 5th April!

Images should be a maximum of 650 pixels wide.

Thanks! 🙂