Category Archives: Religion

A-Z of Somerset: Part 4

Over half way through the alphabet, and it’s the last of four recaps of the alphabetical journey around Somerset so far. Lockdown 2021 means that I have been unable to complete the A-Z, but this brings us up to date with the stop offs so far.

Click on the links to see the full post for each village.


P is for Pilton.

The true home of the Glastonbury Festival, Pilton was something of a hidden gem I am glad I discovered.


Q is for Queen Camel.

Who’d have thought there was a Q but no J in the list. Well, had it not been given as a gift, there wouldn’t have been a Q either!


R is for Rodney Stoke.

Not another Somersetonian (Somersetter?), but this is one of eight villages in the county with something to be thankful for.


S is for Stanton Drew.

Another hidden gem, but not just the village. The Neolithic circle here rivals Avebury and Stonehenge.


T is for Tintinhull.

A manorial vicarage and stunning gardens, but no sign of Snowy the dog…


Twenty letters down, then, and five still to go. When life finds a sense of normality, the A to Z will continue, so watch this space.

A-Z of Somerset: Part 2

My recap of the villages of Somerset continues… Click on the links to read the full posts…


F is for Farrington Gurney.

Not an Edwardian detective, but a 12th century village in the north of the county.


G is for Godney.

When one village just won’t do, why not have three?


H is for Haselbury Plucknett.

Detective Gurney has to have a nemesis, so strike forth, sir!


I is for Isle Abbots.

A river names Isle, and countryside perfection.


K is for Kingweston.

There are no Js in Somerset, so, instead, the first of two villages beginning with a K.


Next week, it’s K (Mk II) to O…

A-Z of Somerset: Part 1

Lockdown 2021 has given a bit of an enforced break on my photographic journey around the villages of Somerset, so I thought it might be good to have a bit of a catch up of the places I have visited so far.

Over the next four Sundays, therefore, I will be having a bit of a recap.

Today, we look at A to E. (Click on the links to see the original posts.)


A is for Ashcott.

On the A39 between Wells and Bridgwater, Aschott sits on a hill overlooking the Somerset Moors around Shapwick.


B is for Baltonsborough.

Nestled on the moors to the south west of Shepton Mallet, the village is a prime place to view Glastonbury Tor.


C is for Charlton Mackrell.

A big house and a close neighbour, Charlton Mackrell is a quiet haven in the countryside.


D is for Dinder.

Quiet and unassuming, Dinder has a hidden secret, designed to protect the nearby city cathedral city.


E is for Evercreech.

A small village, home to a social drinker’s wily scheme…


Next week, villages F to J (ish)…

Crack’d

The stone had been like that for generations, from what he had been told. The chunk of granite had cracked from tip to base, that fateful night in 1874. Nothing else had been touched, no other graves affected, no other souls disturbed. Just this one stone.

The dedication had worn away decades before, the records lost to time. Nobody knew any more whose grave it was, nobody knew if their remains were still there. The rumour was that the devil himself had torn the stone asunder, ripping the body from the ground so that his own domain may remain unsullied.

Who could have been so evil that even the devil didn’t want them as his bedmate? What crimes must they have committed to anger Lucifer so?

And who came each month to lay flowers on the grave with no name?


A-Z of Somerset: Tintinhull

T is for Tintinhull

Just to the north west of Yeovil lies the quiet village of Tintinhull. The derivation of its name is steeped in mystery – ‘tin’ meant ‘fort’ in old English and ‘examine’ in Saxon, while ‘hull’ is an old term for ‘hill’. The village sits in the lea of Ham Hill, so a combination of elements seems likely.

Tintinhull has a population of just over a thousand people, and the manor dates back to pre-Norman times. The local Saxon tribes used to avoid siting their villages on the old Roman roads, so the village sits just away from the Fosse Way (now the A303).


Most of the houses in the village are made from Ham stone – quarried from the local hill – and this gives a quaint, consistent feel to the place. A lot of the original cottages are thatched and, barring the telegraph poles and cars, Tintinhull has the typical chocolate-box feel you would expect of a West Country village.


There is not an immediate heart to the Tintinhull – the village green is surrounded by cottages – but there are plenty of gathering places, both contemporary and historic.

Opposite the new Village Hall, the old Lamb Inn has been tastefully converted to cottages and in the same stretch of road the old Working Men’s Club still bears the Toby Bitter advertising sign.

The remaining village pub – the Crown & Victoria – is set on the way to the manor house, and was obviously the stopping off point for farm workers ending their shift and returning home.


The manor house itself is now owned and run by the National Trust, and it is the connected Tintinhull Gardens that now draw people to this part of Somerset. (Sadly, due to the time of year and the restrictions imposed by the coronavirus pandemic, the gardens were not open at the time of visiting.)


Most of the villages I have visited on this alphabetical journey include the main elements of the manor house, a school, a gathering place and the church, and Tintinhull is no exception.

St Margaret’s Church sits away from the manor house – unusual, as they are normally intrinsically linked. As with most village churchyards, it is a peaceful place, somewhere to reflect and gather one’s thoughts.

Approached by way of a long path, you feel a sense of great reverence as you walk towards St Margaret’s; this sensation is added to by the imposing wall on the left of the path, hiding a dramatic house behind it.

Once in the churchyard itself, the extent of the building behind the wall is revealed; this is Tintinhull Court, in its medieval glory.

Originally the parsonage, it was first built by the abbot of nearby Montacute Priory; remodelled three times since its original construction, it has been designated a Grade I building.

The history of Tintinhull Court begins to make more sense of the village layout; this was the original manor house and its owners built the church next door, with window overlooking the the graveyard and the parishioners walking towards their weekly sermon.

The resident Napper family built Tintinhull House – on the other side of the village – as a dower house in the seventeenth century; close enough that the Court’s widow was in walking distance, but far enough away for her not to disturb the ongoing matters of her heirs.

The graveyard also commemorates three residents who fell on home oil during the First World War.

To find out more about the lives of Private William Newman, Stoker Henry Lucas and Boy Albert Matthews, follow the links, or head over to the CKPonderingsCWG website.


Tintinhull has a long history, and economically it has survived well; primarily an agricultural community, the village has also been a focus for glove-making, dating back as far as the thirteenth century. By the late nineteenth century, much of the village’s employment came from the industry, and it continues today, although on a much reduced level.



Dominating

Just because something seems all powerful, the door is always open to you.

You may not feel welcomed in the way that you would want, but there is always another option, another door that you can choose.

Things can be improved from the inside or the outside.

Which of those two options you choose is entirely up to you.


Trials

Life sometimes makes things seem impossible, the impassable not able to be breached.

The insurmountable is often only that way because you cannot achieve it alone.

It is not a failing to ask for help.

Together, the impossible is possible.


Perseverance

Despite what you might feel right now, it is possible to keep going.

You can weather the storm and come out the other side battered, but still standing.

Your experiences now will lead you to being a stronger person in the future.